How to Export your Kindle Highlights

This is a quick article to share a very surprising and beautiful thing I discovered today: it is possible to request a PDF with all your Kindle’s highlights directly from the Kindle interface.

Unless I am crazy, I remember this being a very (unnecessarily) hard task. I spent an insane amount of time researching the easiest way to do that. I mean, the web is full of paid services with the only purpose of exporting Kindle’s highlights (e.g., Klib and clippings.io come to mind).

Today, instead, I was browsing my Kindle’s note on my physical Kindle, and I discovered a huge “Export Notes” button. At first, I was confused. Then I clicked it, and the Kindle asked me if I wanted to receive by email all my highlights.

I swear to the Universe I was just like this:

Long story short: I selected the “I f**king want!" button and I received an email with a PDF with all my highlights for the book. And I received them also in CSV format!

Seriously. How did this feature pass under the radar of almost every other note-taking nerd I follow? Why nobody notified me and let me export notes like a savage for months?

How to

Let’s see how to do it!

  1. First, go to the “go to” dialog (the one with the Table of Contents of the book).

  2. Select the “Note” tab.

From the “Go To” dialog, select the Notes (sorry, my Kindle is in Italian)
Figure 1. From the “Go To” dialog, select the Notes (sorry, my Kindle is in Italian)
  1. On the bottom you should see the “Export Notes” button.
How can I have missed it?
Figure 2. How can I have missed it?

That’s it. Seriously. It is the best thing ever (at least for Kindle-world)! See you next time!


Photo by Aliis Sinisalu on Unsplash

Header Image
How to build rusqlite on Windows

Yesterday I spent way more time than needed for compiling this dependency on Windows. The problem is that the error was not informative enough and hard to google, and, mostly, that there is no …

Read
Header Image
How to use Rust in Python (Part 3)

You can follow the links to read the first part and the second part of this series. In the previous part we have seen how to pass not trivial data to Rust functions such as a Python list. It is still …

Read
Header Image
How to use Rust in Python (Part 1)

Rust is an amazing language. It is one of the best potential alternatives to C and has been elected two times in a row as the most promising language of the year (by me, :P). However, because its …

Read
comments powered by Disqus