Will Zig be the "sweet spot" I am looking for?

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Let’s continue our exploration of novel kinda-low-level languages. After a quick exploration of Crystal, it is time to look at another language that is constantly popping up on my sources: Zig. It will be my new love? It will be the perfect tool I was looking for? It is the beginning of a new programming langue star? Let’s find out that together.

Will Crystal be the "sweet spot" I am looking for?

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The Crystal programming language recently reached version 1.0. As a modern compiled language, it caught my attention. It is time to spend some time playing with it to have a better idea of its potentialities. Will this “Compiled Ruby” be the sweet spot between Python and Rust I am looking for?

The Grammar of Game Design

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Game Design is a kind of language. It has basic elements, it has rules, and we use it to express specific sensations. Therefore, as a language, it has a proper grammar with its alphabet, its morphology, and its syntax and semantic. In this article I’ll briefly try to exapand this thought.

The link between n-Bounded Compositions and the extended Fibonacci Sequence

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During last year Advent of Code, I ended up discovering a beautiful relation between bounded integer compositions and the generalized Fibonacci sequence. Probably it is an already known relation, but the fact that it popped up in a totally unrelated problem is a remarkable example on how number theory properties may pop up in the most unexpected places.

"Crafting Is (Kinda) Pointless" by Razbuten

This is a very interesting analysis of crafting in modern games. Crafting systems are everywhere but they are often just glorified menus. I agree with Razbuten a lot on this. So check it out!

Hades: a case study in storytelling for roguelike games

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I know, I know: everybody loves Hades, the Super Giant’s latest jewel. These days, it is impossible to read any online game magazine without reading articles about it. This game has been on everybody’s mouth since its official release on September 17th.

And for good reasons.

Hades managed to raise the bar of the roguelike genre just when the genere started to become stale and boring. There are many reasons for this success but, in my opinion, Hades' greatest accomplishment is that it was able to provide a glaring example of a roguelike with a solid storytelling.

Property-Based Testing in Typescript with Fast-Check

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Property-based testing is probably the thing I missed the most from my time working with Haskel. It is such an elegant way of testing functionalities that it is hard to not use it. As you can imagine, I look for a Property-based testing framework in any language I have under my hands. Usually, unsuccessfully. However, in recent years I am working a lot with Typescript and, luckily, Typescript has a good property-based testing library: fast-check.

How to debug a Node.js application remotely in VSCode

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Debugging a remote Node.js application in VSCode is an elementary procedure. Here it is a small “how to” in case you are struggling with it. A quick answer because you want a solution, not the story of my life.

The Trolley Cart Problem is not an AI problem

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Every time there is a discussion on the future of AI-powered Autonomous Vehicles, somebody put the Trolley Cart Problem (TCP) on the table. And every time this happens, I am annoyed. However, recently, I saw some mutual followers studying AI and Computer Science talking about how TCP is a fundamental problem for the future of AI and autonomous vehicles. So I think it is time to speak it loud: ‌the Trolley Cart Problem is not an AI problem! Let’s see why.

Five Tabletop Games for Creating Stuff

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We already know that Procedural Content Generation (PCG) is a masterful tool for building games. But can PGC become a game by itself? This seems a silly question at first. After all, what is the purpose of generating something if we do not use it afterward?

However, if you think that a bit more, you know that there is something else. If you are interested in PCG, you know that most enjoyment comes from the creation itself.

Therefore, the question is easy: of course, that PCG can be a game! And to prove that, I am going to show you five of the most beautiful examples of that I played in recent years.